Week 6: Ful Medamas Fail

The Week 6 box brought fava beans, english peas, raspberries, currants, golden beets, carrots, Swiss chard, sweet potatoes, broccoli, and sweet Vidalia onions. I also took a truly horrible picture of it, complete with unappealing trails of raspberry goo. My excuse is that I picked up the box on the way home after a day of teaching summer camp in which a child managed to set the classroom microwave for 95 minutes and no one noticed, and someone else stepped on a firecracker. I was pretty tired.

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Sweet Potato Curry with Swiss chard

My first project was to make a curry with the sweet potatoes and the Swiss chard. I searched all over the internet for recipes, and ended up choosing this one, mostly because again I already had all of the ingredients at home. It’s from a blog called the Minimalist Baker, and I substituted Swiss chard for kale.

You put a tablespoon and a half of grapeseed oil in a frying pan (In a weirdly self-indulgent act, I actually picked this up from Trader Joe’s instead of just using olive oil. It actually made the cooking process very pleasant!). You saut√© 1 shallot, 2 TB grated ginger, 2 TB minced garlic, and a minced Thai red pepper for a few minutes. Then add 3 TB of red curry paste and a large sweet potato that’s been peeled and cubed.

Add two cans of coconut milk, 1 TB maple syrup, 1 1/2 tsp ground turmeric, and a pinch of salt and bring it to a boil. Simmer from 5-10 minutes (I think I did closer to 15) until the sweet potatoes are soft. Then you add 2 cups chopped Swiss chard, 1/2 cup roasted cashews, and the juice of one lemon. It simmers for a few more minutes, and then it’s ready!

IMG_0354.JPGCSA ingredients used: sweet potatoes, Swiss chard

Other ingredients used: garlic, ginger, Thai red pepper, red curry paste, coconut milk, maple syrup, ground turmeric, salt, cashews, lemon

Ful Medamas

Next up was the fava beans. Andrew was very excited about them and suggested I make ful medamas, which I had never heard of but everyone else seemed to think was delicious. I poked around a bunch of recipes and ended up sort of deciding to follow all of them at once, since general consensus in all recipes was that it was incredibly easy. One recipe told me to soak my fava beans overnight, which I dutifully did. If I read the fine print on the opposite page, it would have been obvious this was only for dried fava beans.

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Fresh from a nice overnight soak

Once I figured out I didn’t need to cook them for two hours either, I became significantly more optimistic. I shelled them and put them in boiling water for about two minutes, and then peeled off the inside skins.

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Then I mushed them up with some lemon juice, a TB olive oil, some cumin, and salt and pepper. There were only about 3 spoonfuls of food, and it didn’t even look remotely like the picture. One of the recipes also recommended serving them with bread and a fried egg, which seemed like a good idea considering this was supposed to be my dinner.

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This is not even remotely what any of the pictures online looked like. Here’s what it’s supposed to look like:

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This guy’s¬†turned out great, and he didn’t even use a recipe

Or this:

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CSA ingredients used: fava beans

Other ingredients used: bread, egg, cumin, lemon juice, olive oil

It’s worth exploring fresh fava beans further, but it seems likely that this dish is one of the few instances where you do a lot better with the canned than the fresh.

Spigarello Returns

As mentioned last week, I had a bit of a surprise the first time I bit into spigarello. I decided to try again, this time with a recipe. The internet has very, very few spigarello recipes. Serious Eats, our usual go-to, yields nothing, and NY Times cooking has only one entry for it. We ended up using this one.

You blanch the spigarello leaves and then drain them in a colander, trying to get them as dry as possible. Then you heat some oil in a frying pan and return them to the pan to brown a bit. Then you add a tsp minced shallot, a tsp minced garlic, and a few red chile flakes. Squeeze a little lemon juice and some honey over the top and they’re done. We had them with salmon and rice.

The browned parts were really nice, and the honey made a big difference, but even after all that they were still quite bitter.

CSA ingredients used: spigarello

Other ingredients used: salmon, rice, lemon, olive oil, honey, salt, pepper

Red Currant Cheesecake

At the end of the week, we still had a plate of gorgeous currants sitting in the refrigerator. We didn’t really know what to make with currants other than scones, but our friend Ben was coming over for dinner and it made more sense to make a dessert than an afternoon snack. Also, I had a sudden craving for cheesecake. Cheesecake is secretly one of my favorite desserts, but I rarely indulge in it because other people seem to find it unhealthy, or something.

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This recipe was from Organic Life. You start with two cups of crumbled ginger snap cookies, with you mush together with 2 1/2 TB sugar and 5 TB butter. Then you press it onto the bottom of a greased 9-inch springform pan. You make it in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes, until the mixture is crispy and brown. Reduce the oven to 325.

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Next, in an electric mixer you mix together 12 oz goat cheese (really), 8 ounces cream cheese, and 1/2 cup buttermilk for 4-5 minutes until it’s smooth and fluffy. Gradually beat in 1/2 cup sugar and 4 eggs one at a time. Add the zest and juice of one lemon. Pour half of the mixture into the springform pan, add 1/4 cup red currants (we added 1/2 cup and could have stood to have more in there. Come on, Organic Life. It’s a red currant cheesecake.) Then you pour the rest of the batter on top and add some more currants.

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To make this, you have to stick the springform pan inside a roasting pan. In order to prevent water from seeping in, you wrap the base of the springform pan in silver foil. Then you pour enough water into the roasting pan to come 2/3 of the way up the springform pan.

The cake cooks for 1 hour and 20 minutes, and then has to cool for about 2 hours before you can eat it.

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CSA ingredients used: red currants (about half of them…stay tuned for scones next week…)

Other ingredients used: goat cheese, cream cheese, buttermilk, sugar, butter, ginger snaps, eggs, lemon

Next: Week 7!